VIDEO: Man Turns Potential Warning Into A Whooping After Fighting Cop

A Sacramento police officer tried to warn a motorist about a violation, but he wasn't having it.

Sacramento, CA – A California man turned a warning into an arrest on May 4, after he argued with a Sacramento police officer, refused to cooperate with the stop, and resisted arrest (videos below.)

A witness’s cellphone footage of the arrest quickly went viral.

On Wednesday, the Sacramento Police Department also released bodycam and store surveillance footage of the incident, which began when 40-year-old Craig Williams pulled into the parking lot of a 7-Eleven convenience store.

He jumped out of his car and ran inside, just moments before a Sacramento police officer exited the building, the video showed.

Due to a delay with the bodycam device, the officer’s initial contact with Williams did not have any sound.

“I’m in the store...and he gets out, leaves the car running, had the stereo just blasting like crazy,” the unnamed officer said later in the bodycam footage.

The officer stopped near Williams’ car, and immediately motioned for Williams to come outside, the surveillance video showed.

“I said, ‘Hey – come out and shut your car off,’” the officer recounted in the bodycam footage. “He said, ‘I didn’t do nothing man!”

The officer said he again told Williams to come outside.

“I didn’t do nothing!” Williams argued again, according to the officer.

A moment later, the officer opened the driver’s door, and appeared to turn off the ignition, as Williams walked outside.

“I’m trying to explain to him...it’s against the law to leave your car running,” the officer explained in the bodycam. “He said, ‘I’m right here.’’

The officer told him it did not matter if he was nearby, and attempted to explain the municipal law to him.

“He’s...screaming and cussing and yelling...So I said, ‘Well, if you’re not going to listen, I’m just going to give you a citation for it,” the officer recounted in the bodycam.

Williams went back inside the store, while the officer went to take some items to his patrol vehicle. The officer then returned to Williams’ vehicle.

“I.D. please,” he said to Williams, who appeared to be setting up to record the interaction on his cell phone.

“For what? I didn’t break no laws,” Williams replied. “You need an I.D. for what?”

“So, you have your car running,” the officer began to explain.

“That has nothing to do with what’s going on, man,” Williams interrupted.

“It’s a misdemeanor to leave your car running,” the officer continued. “Plus, you had your stereo loud, to where it can be...”

“That has nothing to do with what’s going on,” Williams said repeatedly, as he continued to interrupt the officer.

The officer again requested that Williams provide his driver’s license.

“Why am I getting harassed?” Williams asked.

“I’ve already told you. Your car was running...” the officer began.

“That’s against the law?” Williams retorted. “That’s against the law to have your car running? I’m just asking.”

“It is against the law to have your car running when you’re not in it,” the officer replied.

The argument continued briefly, until the officer instructed Williams to set his phone down.

He then grabbed one of Williams’ hands, and calmly told him that he was going to detain him.

“Detain me for what?” Williams yelled. “Ya’ll see this s**t? Look at this s**t!”

“I’ve already told you, sir,” the officer attempted to explain, as Williams repeatedly yelled at witnesses to “call the police.”

Store surveillance and witness video footage showed that the officer only had control of one of Williams’ hands at that point in the altercation, and the officer could be seen positioning his foot in between Williams’ legs to gain better control of the argumentative man.

“I have not done nothin’ wrong,” Williams said repeatedly while recording himself.

“Then relax, and give me your arm,” the officer said in the bodycam video.

“Man, I’m a big man,” Williams cautioned. “I don’t want you to take me down. I don’t want to take you down.”

“Then relax...” the officer began.

“You relax!” Williams yelled. “I ain’t done nothing to break the law!”

“Don’t grab me,” the officer told him at one point.

“Don’t grab me!” Williams replied. “There is no law! There is no law for leaving your car running!”

“I’m going to throw you on the ground here in a second,” the officer calmly cautioned him, as Williams continued to declare that he was being “harassed.”

The officer then took Williams to the ground, at which point the man agreed to stop resisting.

“He’s trying to hurt this man!” one witnessed yelled, as she ran out of the store to record the altercation.

“I give up! I give up!” Williams said from the ground, with his hands raised above his head. “What the f**k, man?”

The officer placed Williams in handcuffs, and led him to his patrol vehicle.

He was subsequently charged with resisting arrest and leaving the ignition key in an unattended vehicle, and was released on his own recognizance on Saturday, The Sacramento Bee reported.

"These videos demonstrate how important it is for there to be a relationship of trust between a police department and the community it serves," the Sacramento Police Department said in a press release on Wednesday. "When that level of trust is absent, even minor incidents — such as a warning of a city code violation — can escalate into unpleasant and even dangerous events."

Williams’ attorney, Justin Ward, claimed that Williams thought the officer was kidding when he warned him about leaving his vehicle running.

"Who here would think that is a crime, right?" Ward told The Sacramento Bee. "I don't believe that Mr. Williams thought that the officer was being serious."

On Wednesday, Williams joined up with Sacramento National Association for the Advancement of Colored People president Betty Williams, and held a press conference to complain about his arrest.

“At the end of the day, he shouldn't have been in jail," she said.

“I am highly disappointed with the actions that the officer took,” Williams said of his arrest, according to KCRA. “The reason I am shocked and appalled is because I am a firm believer that an officer should be a friend to the people of the community they serve first before just being an officer who automatically assumes that we [are] all threats to them, because we’re not.”

“This footage has gone viral," he added. "And more importantly, the awareness has been brought up with respect with how people are being treated in their own communities.”

The incident remains under investigation, police said.

You can watch the footage of the officer’s interaction with Williams in the videos below:

Comments (45)
No. 1-45
Officer Cynical
Officer Cynical

"I don't believe that Mr. Williams thought that the officer was being serious." He doesn't sound serious? He doesn't look serious? And this guy's an attorney. Wow.

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

He resisted and refused to co-operate, but it didn't look like he "fought" the officer (unless one considers fighting and resistance to be the same thing, which I don't).

LEO0301
LEO0301

@Burgers Allday I'm not sure how you came to that conclusion since the camera was jerking all around during the arrest. Pretty difficult, if not impossible, to determine how much resistance he put up from this video. But I do have a question for you. Exactly where do you draw the line on what is considered fighting? To me, the moment he touched the officer he completely changed the scope of things. You never, ever put your hand on an officer. In legal parlance, that is called battery. Unless I've given you permission, you can not put your hands on me.

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

I've seen a few fights in my day. That wasn't one of them.

Mrjim138
Mrjim138

another case of an Obama entitled black man that don't have to comply with the police .when will you learn ? if he ask for ID just show it and fight it in court don't be stupid

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

Also, I don't have an opinion about whether the arrestee committed a battery in this particular case (he is not being charged with that), but I will say that citizens are privileged to resist police officers who are using excessive force. May not always be a good idea, but it is one circumstance where resistance is legally allowed. Police officers sometimes don't understand the law on that point, and there is a need for education on that.

Hi_estComnDenomn
Hi_estComnDenomn

@Mrjim138
I wonder when you will stop using Obama as your personal bogeyman. He hasn't been in the public eye going on 1 and a half years. Eventually you're going to have to let go.

Hippygal
Hippygal

@Burgers Allday, when this man refused to follow the officer's commands things started going south, and when he put his hands on the officer, that is considered resisting any way you look at it. I don't know where you are from but I have NEVER heard of resistance being legal against a LEO. The only time I touch an officer is to hug them and thank them for their service and I make SURE they know beforehand what I am doing.

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

It is not generally a good idea, as a practical matter, to resist even excessive force. However, all police officers should understand that it is the citizen's right to do so. I am not supporting this arrestee -- I think he acted stupidly -- and we probably all agree on that.

JBo
JBo

Idiot managed to snatch the verbal warning from the jaws of victory and turn it into an arrest. Perfect!

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

That not a correct characterization of what I said, Milman.

CRETE GARY
CRETE GARY

He di not do nutten.Where have I heard that before?

theJacob
theJacob

Just another fool that thinks his mouth is more powerful than a cop.... lol.

John-Brown
John-Brown

Bugger said: "I've SEEN a few fights in my day." Another pussy that has never even been in a fight commenting on fighting vs. resisting. Priceless.

MiguelDominguez
MiguelDominguez

You have got to be kidding me. Here's a thought: if a police officer tells you that it is against city regulations to walk on both feet and orders you to hop on one leg, you do it. If he tells you to drop your pants and slap your ass cheeks while saying 'you like it, don't ya, slut', you do it. Then you go to court and make a gazillion dollars in the settlement. What you don't do is act like a entitled little bitch whining about everything and fighting a police officer. So yeah, go fuck yourself.

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

All fighting is resisting, but not all resisting is fighting. So resisting versus fighting is what is referred to as a "false dichotomy." When defining and applying words, it is more important to have a good intellect than it is to have had the bravery to have taken a bunch of punches to the dome. Bravery is a good thing in some contexts, but it is not always the most important virtue one can have.

John-Brown
John-Brown

I believe it is illegal in every state to leave an unattended vehicle running. This guy can't be this stupid. Just disrespectful of laws that are there to protect idiots like this.

61mouse
61mouse

Another SCUMBAMMA RELATIVE

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

Not every state. In northern states it tends not to be illegal because people used to idle their cars in cold weather back when that was helpful. But, yeah, not a wise move in Sacramento where it is illegal, unhelpful and predictably leads to vehicle theft. the man was stupid for giving the policeman a hard time. If you want to do that then it is better to do that on the internet where you don't get into a physical confrontation with the officer.

LEO0301
LEO0301

@Burgers Allday what is your background in law enforcement? You know just enough about the law to be dangerous. Were you a cop or a lawyer or a did you spend time in prison where you honed up on the law? In the state where I policed, there are different degrees of resisting. There is resisting arrest without violence, which can be anything from running away from a police officer to not cooperating while being handcuffed. Then there is resisting arrest with violence. This charge maybe a little subjective because in my mind if I have to wrestle someone to the ground to make an arrest, that person is using violence in an attempt to prevent it. When in doubt I always went with the higher charge and let the state attorney figure it out from there. Then there is battery on a LEO. Battery is unlawful touching of someone. If you put your hands on me without my permission you have committed battery. As a rule I only charged someone with that crime when they swung at me during an arrest but if I wanted to I could go with it every time someone decided they wanted to fight rather than submit to the arrest.

John-Brown
John-Brown

Bugger, stop making up shit. First off I said, "I believe". Second, the vast majority of "Northern" states have laws against unattended, running vehicles. Here is just a taste:

Connecticut

Delaware

Illinois

Maine

Massachusetts

Minnesota

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

Ohio

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

Vermont

Washington

Wisconsin

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

The guy here resisted arrest, primarily with what he did before the officer tried to take him down. The prosecutor might drop the charge to discourage police from escalating quite so quickly, and that might be a good outcome. As far as his resistance during the process of being taken to the ground, that might (or might not) be considered as reasonable and necessary to avoid having his head hit the pavement during the takedown. Sometimes bad things can happen when one doesn't resist during the takedown:

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

Yes, the laws are gradually changing in northern states because modern cars don't tend to need to be idled in cold weather. I have no problem with that.

John-Brown
John-Brown

Bugger, prove that statement.

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

"prove that statement" well, I will turn to that most respected of all media sources called WAPO: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/12/29/the-biggest-winter-energy-myth-that-you-need-to-idle-your-car-before-driving/?utm_term=.7fc9bc44d238 Long story short: cars used to need to be idled but they don't anymore.

John-Brown
John-Brown

No, prove the statement that " the laws are gradually changing in northern states".

John-Brown
John-Brown

Pretty weak example. Keep looking. I love wasting your time because in reality, I don't really care. But keep looking nonetheless ;-)

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

The good thing is that the police set a good example by never allowing their vehicles to idle in business parking lots while they pop in for a free coffee!

GForce48
GForce48

High percentage of stolen cars these days come from idling cars! Who but an idiot doesn't know it is against the law in many states to leave a car running unattended? This behavior is one of the legacies from the 0bama/Holder regime. Thanks a lot!

John-Brown
John-Brown

And who would want to steal a classic Chevy Nova with Corvette Rally wheels on it?

RunCop
RunCop

Another useless brown turd....of course defended by the useless naaColoredp.

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

One interesting, kind of semi-related thing, is that with keyless ignitions and cars that go very quiet when stopped, it is surprisingly easy to leave a car running without even realizing it. Speaking as one who has never left a car running (even back when that was legal), I have recently wondered whether that is going to cause a theft problem. I guess we will see.

ReserveDepty3431
ReserveDepty3431

Another dindu goes down lol. “I’m a big man” lmao

Dangerdoug
Dangerdoug

Come on man, come on man, come on man, etc etc

Nomoreracecards
Nomoreracecards

@ Hi_estcomndenomn. You are so wrong about that. Barry may have been out of office for a year and a half, BUT. That racist POS pResident single handedly caused the biggest rift between blacks and LEO's than any group in history. It's gonna be his fault for decades.

Hi_estComnDenomn
Hi_estComnDenomn

@Nomoreracecards
Youre aware that cops aren't a race, right?

And no, he didnt. People with cell phones bad cop behavior to the world led to a large number of the public not trusting cops. Black folk already knew the story. Cell phones showed the story to everyone else.

If you think Obama is the reason blacks don't trust cops, then I'll just assume you were in a coma your whole life until he was elected.

LEO0301
LEO0301

@Burgers Allday hey Mr Cheese Burger, I asked you a question. Why don't you answer it? What do you have to hide?

Det_John_Kimble
Det_John_Kimble

I wish this would happen every single time I see one of these type of assclowns get out of their cars leaving it running with music blasting loud as hell, usually rap music (but not always) full of bad language and bad everything my kids shouldn't hear. But if you as a civilian politely ask them to turn it down show some respect for others, they will either tell you to fuck off, or want to get into a fight with you. Serves him right.

Pat1978
Pat1978

Cars get stolen because of what this guy did. Then idiots get upset that their car was stolen. What if the cop never saw the dude in the car (and didn't know who it belonged to), saw it was running, then saw a dude go to get in and it wasn't the owner (remember the cop has no idea who owns the car)? Would the owner be mad if he saw the cop let the thief drive off? What if the cop asked the thief for ID, thief told cop to f#(+ off because he knows his rights, so cop said have a nice day Sir? I guess amateurs should stop judging a job they have no clue about.

Old Hawg
Old Hawg

Is it at all possible that the laws passed making leaving an unattended motor vehicle running were passed for a REASON? Has it ever been known for miscreants to hang around establishments where leaving running vehicles is commonplace to jump in the vehicle in the very few seconds it takes to do that and drive off in a (now) stolen car? Anyone who doesn't realize the truths in this should be subject to
constant adult supervision.