Trooper Collapses After Arresting Drug Suspect, Needs 3 Doses Of Narcan

Vermont State Police Acting Sergeant Brett Flansburg was exposed to an opioid while conducting a traffic stop.

Leicester, VT – A Vermont state trooper collapsed after he was exposed to the opioid fentanyl during a traffic stop and required multiple doses of Narcan to be revived.

The incident began at about 11:25 p.m. on March 15 when Vermont State Police Acting Sergeant Brett Flansburg initiated a traffic stop on Leicester Whiting Road, according to a press release from the state police.

Sgt. Flansburg saw the passenger swallow something he later admitted was a baggie of cocaine while he was talking to the driver during the stop.

He searched the vehicle and found a baggie of heroin, an empty plastic baggie, and a syringe, the press release said.

Other troopers on the scene took the passenger, 25-year-old Taylor Woodward, into custody on suspicious of possessing heroin.

On his way back to the New Haven barracks with the evidence from the stop, Sgt. Flansburg began to feel ill, according to the press release.

He made it to the barracks parking lot and called for help before he collapsed to the pavement.

Troopers found him unresponsive and immediately administered two doses of the opiate reversal drug Narcan, the press release said.

Sgt. Flansburg was given a third dose of Narcan as he was being transported to the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington and began to regain consciousness.

He was given additional medical treatment for the overdose at the hospital before he was released.

Vermont State Police Lieutenant Maurice Lamothe said it appeared, at first glance, as though Sgt. Flansburg had done everything right during the traffic stop.

"He was as safe as he could be. But there is always a chance that, despite everything that you do to be safe that there's always the chance that something like this could happen," Lt. Maurice told WCAX. "So we're looking at to see exactly how it occurred and hopefully we can prevent something like this from happening in the future."

Troopers also transported Woodward to the same hospital as Sgt. Flansburg as a precaution, but the suspect required no medical care, according to the state police.

He is facing a misdemeanor charge for possession of heroin and is expected to appear in Vermont Superior Court on May 6.

Vermont State Police Director Colonel Matthew Birmingham has ordered the state police’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation to conduct a thorough review of the incident.

Tests are being run to determine what exactly the substance was that sickened the trooper, but it is believed to likely be fentanyl.

“Being a state trooper is a dangerous and demanding job for all the reasons you’d expect: apprehending criminals, encountering volatile individuals, rushing toward emergencies rather than away,” Col. Birmingham said. “And now there is a new threat that we’re seeing up close: the risk of exposure to powerful drugs that can kill in even tiny amounts. This is so troubling and disconcerting, and it places members of law enforcement at unnecessary risk of possibly losing their lives.”

“We are incredibly lucky and extremely thankful that Sgt. Flansburg is alive and recovering today,” the colonel continued. “Were it not for the immediate availability of Narcan and the quick actions of his fellow troopers and medical personnel, we might be speaking today about the death of a trooper in the line of duty. I’m angry at how close we came, and relieved that the situation was no worse than it was.”

Similar incidences of law enforcement officers and other first responders being exposed to and reacting to fentanyl have cropped up all over the United States in recent months.

Numerous law enforcement agencies have added training for dealing with potential exposures, and many departments are now carrying Narcan in police vehicles rather than waiting for an ambulance to arrive in an emergency situation.

Comments (22)
No. 1-12
Macsmitty
Macsmitty

*Narcan. LE carry narcan in case of accidental overdose, not fentanyl.

IseeWhereThisIsGoing
IseeWhereThisIsGoing

How was the trooper exposed enough drugs to need narcan, yet the occupant of the car, who like was exposed for much longer, wasn't?

joaquinradioman
joaquinradioman

The article said this happened in other instances as well!!! It’s amazing how ill some can get from just being near the drug!

Jsmoe
Jsmoe

How is it misdemeanor possession of heroin when it’s a schedule 1 narcotic, which is a felony under federal law.

investigator
investigator

A MISDEMEANOR???????? WTH!

BlueLM101
BlueLM101

In these types of situations the person carrying or selling this poison should face real charges, i.e. attempted murder. I'm just glad the Trooper is safe and recovering.

EmmanB
EmmanB

Don't you mean they now carry NARCAN (not Fentanyl) in their cruisers?

Michael Bryant
Michael Bryant

@investigator agree WTF..

Ljubica48
Ljubica48

Fentanyl is a deadly chemical, of which only a few grains is enough to kill an adult male. Last year the Border Patrol seized enough Fentanyl to kill every American, every man, woman, and child twice over. Fentanyl is the Mexican equivalent of sarin gas, and constitutes chemical warfare being waged against the USA by the drug cartels. The American military needs to recognize the chemical warfare threat posed by the criminal terrorists that make up the drug cartels, and start sending Predator Drones with Hellfire missles southbound.

dsmarine
dsmarine

It would appear that the bad guys are weaponizing fentanyl! Thoughts?

SkidgeMarks
SkidgeMarks

Talk about a real lightweight! Haha

LynnSB
LynnSB

How can a FOURTEEN YEAR OLD Consent to Sex -- She's a MINOR !! >> It turns out that in 1988, DeShan had a long-term sexual relationship with a 14-year-old girl while he was a Roman Catholic priest in Bridgeport, Connecticut.The girl gave birth to DeShan’s child in 1990, the Camden Courier Post reported. << Why wasn't this POS in PRISON ????? Again the Legal System FAILED US !!!!!