State Attorney Aramis Ayala Still Filing Motions To Help Markeith Loyd After Being Removed As Prosec

Orlando, FL - The Markeith Loyd case becomes even more bizarre as State Attorney Aramis Ayala has filed a motion to remove the death penalty from Loyd's case after Governor Rick Scott removed her from the case in an Executive Order last week.

According to Click Orlando, Loyd was in court under for

Orlando, FL - The Markeith Loyd case becomes even more bizarre as State Attorney Aramis Ayala has filed a motion to remove the death penalty from Loyd's case after Governor Rick Scott removed her from the case in an Executive Order last week.

According to Click Orlando, Loyd was in court under for a status hearing on Monday. Judge Lauten asked him if he intended to represent himself, and he said yes. Numerous attempts to have an attorney appointed to represent Loyd have been made, and he has turned them all down. In a previous hearing, a public defender was appointed and placed on standby.

Loyd whined to the judge, claiming a lack of medical care. He also stated that he is unable to do research or use the phone. Judge Lauten replied that an attorney could address those issues for him.

Monday's hearing was the first court appearance for newly appointed case prosecutor State Attorney Brad King. The previous prosecutor, State Attorney Aramis Ayala, had been removed from the case by Governor Rick Scott because she refused to seek the death penalty in the case, and made a media circus saying that she would not seek the death penalty in any case that she prosecuted.

In an extremely bold case of arrogance, Aramis Ayala issued a statement that said a motion had been filed to suspend the hearings for Loyd.

In the statement, she said that Governor Scott does not have the power to remove her from the Loyd case and then said that she did not want to "hold up the process and further impact the families," that she understood it was "a time sensitive matter," and that she would like to see "the successful prosecution" of Loyd.

Loyd's response was that he objected to State Attorney Brad King being appointed to prosecute his case. Brad King said that he was unaware of Ayala's latest motion.

"But, I would say the filing of the governor's executive order divests Ms. Ayala of any jurisdiction to be a party in this cause. The governor has appointed me," King said.

The public defender assigned to represent Loyd in spite of his protests filed a motion for conflict of interest because he has represented other people that were charged in the case.

Judge Lauten set a court date of March 28th to address Aramis Ayala's motion to remain on the case, conflicts of interest in the public defender's office, and whether Loyd will have a competency hearing.

Loyd's arrogance is beyond my comprehension. I am not aware of any defendant having any choice in who prosecutes his case. He is getting medical care while in jail and access to a phone per state law and jail policy and procedure. As for the public defender, it was my understanding that charges against his clients had been quietly dropped, so there should be no ongoing conflict of interest

Finally, as for State Attorney Aramis Ayala, her arrogance is also beyond my comprehension. Perhaps she needs to be reminded that her personal beliefs do not override her duties in her job as State Attorney. The state of Florida allows for the death penalty in certain cases that meet specific guidelines, which the Loyd case does. It's her job to seek the death penalty in these cases.

Where is the justice for Orlando Police Lieutenant Debra Clayton? Where is the justice for Sade Dixon and her unborn child? For Orange County Deputy Normal Lewis, who died trying to get to Lieutenant Clayton to help her? And for their families?

Aramis Ayala is not qualified to hold her position, and she does not have the best interests of the victims' families in mind. Rather, she seeks to impose her personal beliefs and convictions on a case that deserves the death penalty, and sooner rather than later. Aramis Ayala should resign or be recalled, and the blood of those that died in this case supports that.

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