Shooting Victim's Father Shuts Up Those Opposed To Arming Teachers

Parents who don't want their children protected by armed school personnel can go to a gun-free school, one father said.

Parkland, FL – The father of a girl who was murdered during the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School said that parents who don’t want their children to attend schools where teachers are trained and armed to protect students always have the option of sending their kids to a different school.

“This is America, and...you have the choice to go to any school you want,” Andrew Pollack, whose daughter, Meadow, was murdered in the attack, told CNN. “If you don’t want a teacher, or a marshal, or you don’t want someone with a gun at your school, you go to a gun-free school zone. That’s where you go. You take your kid, and you go to a school that has gun-free zone, and you take them there.”

Pollack was in attendance at President Donald Trump’s Feb. 21 meeting at the White House, during which the president suggested the idea of arming school staff.

"If you had a teacher who was adept with the firearm, they could end the attack very quickly," Trump said at the gathering, according to CNN. “This would be obviously only for people who were very adept at handling a gun, and it would be...concealed carry...They’d go for special training.”

The concept of arming school personnel has become increasingly controversial in the wake of the Florida school shooting, and has caused passionate responses from both sides of the argument.

"I'm pissed,” Pollack told Trump during the meeting. “It was my daughter I am not going to see again. She is not here. She is not here. She is in North Lauderdale at...King David Cemetery. That is where I go to see my kid now."

“It’s simple. Let’s fix it,” he told the president.

The Florida State Legislature recently advanced bills that would devote $67 million to help train teachers and school staff members to carry concealed weapons as school marshals, the Huffington Post reported.

The program would be voluntary, and those who opted to participate would be specifically trained to help protect students, Pollack told CNN.

“The parent that wants to go to a school where there’s a marshal, or there’s a police presence, they send their kid there,” he said, adding that parents who disagreed would have the option to go to gun-free schools.

Despite his loss, Pollack said he has heard Meadow’s voice in his head, calling him “Daddy,” and that it made him feel “empowered to do what I have to do,” to protect children.

“When someone murders your kid...you just get a certain power...I can do anything,” he said.

Comments (26)
No. 1-26
bronx163
bronx163

At least this father sees commonsense solution.
Signage saying gun free zone tells evil killers the sheep are free to be slaughtered. Good guy standing overwatch will always keep the sheep safe. Long as hes not a broward county deputy.

b1rd
b1rd

My heart goes out to these parents. He is right though. If you don't want to send your kids to a school where the teachers are armed, sent them to a gun free school.

Sickandtired
Sickandtired

Guns are not the problem. The types of guns are not the problem. The culture in America now is the problem. In the 70's there were more gun owning households than now. What we didn't have then were mass school shootings like now. Violent video games and just the amount of raw violence in our society today has desensitized younger people to violence. Playing games like Call of Duty day after day helps to create the school shooters of today.

Sickandtired
Sickandtired

Charles Whitman managed to kill 17 people and injure more than 30 with nothing more than hunting rifles. It doesn't take an AR to kill a lot of people.

Caprice56
Caprice56

My heart hurts for his loss. And I am in awe of his courage in facing this and finding a solution. He’s right! You can chose where to send your child. I would send mine to anarmed school where they may stand a chance.

Just-My-Thoughts
Just-My-Thoughts

My issue with arming teachers is that there are kids who will try to overpower and disarm the teacher. Personally, I would be in favor of hiring off duty/retired/military to protect the schools. Sadly, also have metal detectors at the door(s) Just my thoughts.

Poileas
Poileas

I cannot speak for or against anyone that has suffered a loss due to gun violence. I can speak for myself as a veteran of law enforcement and the military having been a victim of gun violence (never wounded) and as a family member of over a dozen deaths due gun violence. As multiple persons in my family being teachers I have asked them about this. 1 out several is a licensed concealed carrier would not carry at school due to student on teacher violence. She has not been assaulted as of yet in her 4 years but has been threatened. She is not comfortable enough with her skills to retain a firearm. Yet this is an active classroom teacher, what about those that do admin duties. She does not see a reason why they could not carry if they so chose. Then she says that the Union is strictly against it.

As for a retired cop, prison guard, jail guard or military vet. Not all of these people are skilled in the art of gun fighter tactics. He'll, my cousin is a three gun competition shooter that I would trust over some of my swat brothers.

There is no easy answer. When I went to rural Texas schools in 1960-70s you would have had a student fire you up as well as the teacher, but that was then when your mom, dad, aunts, uncles, grandma, grandpa, neighbors and teachers would beat yer was if you even act disrespectful or out of line.

b1rd
b1rd

This is an instance where a lock box could be provided in the areas.

b1rd
b1rd

Except you can't google a fricking handgun safe for sale.

Sickandtired
Sickandtired

Just google gun safe. Pistol safe also works.

Hi_estComnDenomn
Hi_estComnDenomn

@Sickandtired video games have never been, and will never be the problem. If that were the case, there would be millions of children shooting up schools around the world. This is an inherently American problem, and video games have absolutely nothing to do with it.

Trump
Trump

These are the real picture of pollack not being shown here, i don't know why.

AloeAndApache
AloeAndApache

It would still be possible for them to overpower the off-duty/retired/military, just harder. Also, it would be concealed carry, so if they reached for the gun, the teachers would know. Still a great solution to the problem just for different reasons. And the metal detectors would be bad, everything has metal, zippers on backpacks, binders, jackets, everything :p
I like your thinking though

Sickandtired
Sickandtired

I am saying violent video games are just one of the many things that have helped desensitized some. No they do not screw up every person who plays, them, I play them, but there is a certain type of person who is already screwed up and I do believe they may help to push them over the edge. So what would you say is the cause of the rise in school shootings in the last 20 years or so? Something has changed. It is a culture problem, and not a gun problem.

b1rd
b1rd

Yea, I know. Just pointing out that Google restrictions are really ignorant.

b1rd
b1rd

Right. Guns have been around a lot longer than video games. Video games are a RECENT addition to society. Mass shootings are a RECENT unacceptable trend. It just doesn't add up.

b1rd
b1rd
Richard Kurtz
Richard Kurtz

I agree. People blame the guns or the types of guns instead of the messed up morals of many people. Now why is it so easy for some of them to do what they do? I am not talking about the ability to get a gun, but the ability to justify it in their mind that what they are doing is OK? How do they bring themselves to do something like that? Something is casing it, and it isn't the availability of guns. It is the lack of moral compass so many seem to have these days. The glorification of violence form an early age. This comes is many forms, from movies, TV and yes, video games.

Radicon71
Radicon71

You know, If it was a hush hush situation the kids would not even know who is and who isnt.

b1rd
b1rd

I find it incredibly hard to believe you are this stupid but, I do make mistakes every day ya know.

Dfc3166
Dfc3166

I guess I'm hung up on the fact that parents don't spend time with their kids. They don't show them things, teach them things, correct them, punish them, praise them, laugh with them, you get the idea. It was ok for my friends to correct my kid also, it was ok for them to say," knock it off". I am a hunter and so are my friends, all our kids were brought up around firearms, they all shot them, learned how to handle them, learned many other lessons from having this life style of being outdoors. Many of the kids grew up to enjoy the outdoors, camping, fishing, processing food, etc. Maybe we were all lucky, but it was ok for some other parent to correct my kid, and it was ok for me to correct theirs. It was ok to ride herd over your kid, they might not have liked it so much then but almost everyone one of those kids have said thanks now that they are older. Simple things, like, put your tools away so you know where they are, the job took you 5 minutes it took you a half hour to find your wrench. Hey, leave for work early incase something happens, plus you get in on time. I have been thanked many times for just these two examples. Thanks Dad for teaching me to be early, these guys so up 30 minutes late everyday, makes my job hard every time. They take breaks when it's busy, you don't do that.
I've heard people complain of all the prescriptions young people are on. That burns me to no end, that pill doesn't teach them respect, that pill doesn't teach them right from wrong, that pill isn't magic, you still have to do your job. I may be way off base but I still believe, a big part of the problem is us as parents, lacking doing the job, too wrapped up in ourselves instead of being wrapped up in our kids. I honestly don't see it as a gun issue, there's way more to it then that.

Beanie
Beanie

May your daughter Rest In Peace but arming teachers is not the solution. Sorry....

AmyGriffith
AmyGriffith
Dfc3166
Dfc3166 said: I guess I'm hung up on the fact that parents don't spend time with their kids. They don't show them things, teach them things, correct them, punish them, praise them, laugh with them, you get the idea. It was ok for my friends to correct my kid also, it was ok for them to say," knock it off". I am a hunter and so are my friends, all our kids were brought up around firearms, they all shot them, learned how to handle them, learned many other lessons from having this life style of being outdoors. Many of the kids grew up to enjoy the outdoors, camping, fishing, processing food, etc. Maybe we were all lucky, but it was ok for some other parent to correct my kid, and it was ok for me to correct theirs. It was ok to ride herd over your kid, they might not have liked it so much then but almost everyone one of those kids have said thanks now that they are older. Simple things, like, put your tools away so you know where they are, the job took you 5 minutes it took you a half hour to find your wrench. Hey, leave for work early incase something happens, plus you get in on time. I have been thanked many times for just these two examples. Thanks Dad for teaching me to be early, these guys so up 30 minutes late everyday, makes my job hard every time. They take breaks when it's busy, you don't do that. I've heard people complain of all the prescriptions young people are on. That burns me to no end, that pill doesn't teach them respect, that pill doesn't teach them right from wrong, that pill isn't magic, you still have to do your job. I may be way off base but I still believe, a big part of the problem is us as parents, lacking doing the job, too wrapped up in ourselves instead of being wrapped up in our kids. I honestly don't see it as a gun issue, there's way more to it then that.

Thank you.

lmccall728
lmccall728
Dfc3166
Dfc3166 said: I guess I'm hung up on the fact that parents don't spend time with their kids. They don't show them things, teach them things, correct them, punish them, praise them, laugh with them, you get the idea. It was ok for my friends to correct my kid also, it was ok for them to say," knock it off". I am a hunter and so are my friends, all our kids were brought up around firearms, they all shot them, learned how to handle them, learned many other lessons from having this life style of being outdoors. Many of the kids grew up to enjoy the outdoors, camping, fishing, processing food, etc. Maybe we were all lucky, but it was ok for some other parent to correct my kid, and it was ok for me to correct theirs. It was ok to ride herd over your kid, they might not have liked it so much then but almost everyone one of those kids have said thanks now that they are older. Simple things, like, put your tools away so you know where they are, the job took you 5 minutes it took you a half hour to find your wrench. Hey, leave for work early incase something happens, plus you get in on time. I have been thanked many times for just these two examples. Thanks Dad for teaching me to be early, these guys so up 30 minutes late everyday, makes my job hard every time. They take breaks when it's busy, you don't do that. I've heard people complain of all the prescriptions young people are on. That burns me to no end, that pill doesn't teach them respect, that pill doesn't teach them right from wrong, that pill isn't magic, you still have to do your job. I may be way off base but I still believe, a big part of the problem is us as parents, lacking doing the job, too wrapped up in ourselves instead of being wrapped up in our kids. I honestly don't see it as a gun issue, there's way more to it then that.

I agree - when I was a kid it was also ok for a teacher to discipline kids, and the parents would back the teacher up, not run to their kids defense. Kids these days are bubble-wrapped and protected from any kind of negativity or getting their feelings hurt or rejection, which makes them ultra sensitive. Then when they are rejected later, or something negative happens, they snap because that bubble wrap is gone.