Shooting Victim's Father Shuts Up Those Opposed To Arming Teachers

Parents who don't want their children protected by armed school personnel can go to a gun-free school, one father said.

Parkland, FL – The father of a girl who was murdered during the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School said that parents who don’t want their children to attend schools where teachers are trained and armed to protect students always have the option of sending their kids to a different school.

“This is America, and...you have the choice to go to any school you want,” Andrew Pollack, whose daughter, Meadow, was murdered in the attack, told CNN. “If you don’t want a teacher, or a marshal, or you don’t want someone with a gun at your school, you go to a gun-free school zone. That’s where you go. You take your kid, and you go to a school that has gun-free zone, and you take them there.”

Pollack was in attendance at President Donald Trump’s Feb. 21 meeting at the White House, during which the president suggested the idea of arming school staff.

"If you had a teacher who was adept with the firearm, they could end the attack very quickly," Trump said at the gathering, according to CNN. “This would be obviously only for people who were very adept at handling a gun, and it would be...concealed carry...They’d go for special training.”

The concept of arming school personnel has become increasingly controversial in the wake of the Florida school shooting, and has caused passionate responses from both sides of the argument.

"I'm pissed,” Pollack told Trump during the meeting. “It was my daughter I am not going to see again. She is not here. She is not here. She is in North Lauderdale at...King David Cemetery. That is where I go to see my kid now."

“It’s simple. Let’s fix it,” he told the president.

The Florida State Legislature recently advanced bills that would devote $67 million to help train teachers and school staff members to carry concealed weapons as school marshals, the Huffington Post reported.

The program would be voluntary, and those who opted to participate would be specifically trained to help protect students, Pollack told CNN.

“The parent that wants to go to a school where there’s a marshal, or there’s a police presence, they send their kid there,” he said, adding that parents who disagreed would have the option to go to gun-free schools.

Despite his loss, Pollack said he has heard Meadow’s voice in his head, calling him “Daddy,” and that it made him feel “empowered to do what I have to do,” to protect children.

“When someone murders your kid...you just get a certain power...I can do anything,” he said.

Comments
lmccall728
lmccall728
Dfc3166
Dfc3166 said: I guess I'm hung up on the fact that parents don't spend time with their kids. They don't show them things, teach them things, correct them, punish them, praise them, laugh with them, you get the idea. It was ok for my friends to correct my kid also, it was ok for them to say," knock it off". I am a hunter and so are my friends, all our kids were brought up around firearms, they all shot them, learned how to handle them, learned many other lessons from having this life style of being outdoors. Many of the kids grew up to enjoy the outdoors, camping, fishing, processing food, etc. Maybe we were all lucky, but it was ok for some other parent to correct my kid, and it was ok for me to correct theirs. It was ok to ride herd over your kid, they might not have liked it so much then but almost everyone one of those kids have said thanks now that they are older. Simple things, like, put your tools away so you know where they are, the job took you 5 minutes it took you a half hour to find your wrench. Hey, leave for work early incase something happens, plus you get in on time. I have been thanked many times for just these two examples. Thanks Dad for teaching me to be early, these guys so up 30 minutes late everyday, makes my job hard every time. They take breaks when it's busy, you don't do that. I've heard people complain of all the prescriptions young people are on. That burns me to no end, that pill doesn't teach them respect, that pill doesn't teach them right from wrong, that pill isn't magic, you still have to do your job. I may be way off base but I still believe, a big part of the problem is us as parents, lacking doing the job, too wrapped up in ourselves instead of being wrapped up in our kids. I honestly don't see it as a gun issue, there's way more to it then that.

I agree - when I was a kid it was also ok for a teacher to discipline kids, and the parents would back the teacher up, not run to their kids defense. Kids these days are bubble-wrapped and protected from any kind of negativity or getting their feelings hurt or rejection, which makes them ultra sensitive. Then when they are rejected later, or something negative happens, they snap because that bubble wrap is gone.

AmyGriffith
AmyGriffith
Dfc3166
Dfc3166 said: I guess I'm hung up on the fact that parents don't spend time with their kids. They don't show them things, teach them things, correct them, punish them, praise them, laugh with them, you get the idea. It was ok for my friends to correct my kid also, it was ok for them to say," knock it off". I am a hunter and so are my friends, all our kids were brought up around firearms, they all shot them, learned how to handle them, learned many other lessons from having this life style of being outdoors. Many of the kids grew up to enjoy the outdoors, camping, fishing, processing food, etc. Maybe we were all lucky, but it was ok for some other parent to correct my kid, and it was ok for me to correct theirs. It was ok to ride herd over your kid, they might not have liked it so much then but almost everyone one of those kids have said thanks now that they are older. Simple things, like, put your tools away so you know where they are, the job took you 5 minutes it took you a half hour to find your wrench. Hey, leave for work early incase something happens, plus you get in on time. I have been thanked many times for just these two examples. Thanks Dad for teaching me to be early, these guys so up 30 minutes late everyday, makes my job hard every time. They take breaks when it's busy, you don't do that. I've heard people complain of all the prescriptions young people are on. That burns me to no end, that pill doesn't teach them respect, that pill doesn't teach them right from wrong, that pill isn't magic, you still have to do your job. I may be way off base but I still believe, a big part of the problem is us as parents, lacking doing the job, too wrapped up in ourselves instead of being wrapped up in our kids. I honestly don't see it as a gun issue, there's way more to it then that.

Thank you.

Beanie
Beanie

May your daughter Rest In Peace but arming teachers is not the solution. Sorry....

Dfc3166
Dfc3166

I guess I'm hung up on the fact that parents don't spend time with their kids. They don't show them things, teach them things, correct them, punish them, praise them, laugh with them, you get the idea. It was ok for my friends to correct my kid also, it was ok for them to say," knock it off". I am a hunter and so are my friends, all our kids were brought up around firearms, they all shot them, learned how to handle them, learned many other lessons from having this life style of being outdoors. Many of the kids grew up to enjoy the outdoors, camping, fishing, processing food, etc. Maybe we were all lucky, but it was ok for some other parent to correct my kid, and it was ok for me to correct theirs. It was ok to ride herd over your kid, they might not have liked it so much then but almost everyone one of those kids have said thanks now that they are older. Simple things, like, put your tools away so you know where they are, the job took you 5 minutes it took you a half hour to find your wrench. Hey, leave for work early incase something happens, plus you get in on time. I have been thanked many times for just these two examples. Thanks Dad for teaching me to be early, these guys so up 30 minutes late everyday, makes my job hard every time. They take breaks when it's busy, you don't do that.
I've heard people complain of all the prescriptions young people are on. That burns me to no end, that pill doesn't teach them respect, that pill doesn't teach them right from wrong, that pill isn't magic, you still have to do your job. I may be way off base but I still believe, a big part of the problem is us as parents, lacking doing the job, too wrapped up in ourselves instead of being wrapped up in our kids. I honestly don't see it as a gun issue, there's way more to it then that.