San Francisco PD Investigating Pepsi Over Kendall Jenner Ad

San Francisco, CA - San Francisco PD is investigating if Pepsi was given permission to use their patch in the now-infamous ad starring Kendall Jenner.

San Francisco PD wasn't happy about seeing their patch utilized in the Pepsi ad.

"It's not 100 percent identical but it appears to be our patch,"

San Francisco, CA - San Francisco PD is investigating if Pepsi was given permission to use their patch in the now-infamous ad starring Kendall Jenner.

San Francisco PD wasn't happy about seeing their patch utilized in the Pepsi ad.

"It's not 100 percent identical but it appears to be our patch," said SFPD spokesperson Officer Robert Rueca, according to ABC 7. "After our understanding that this occurred, we are investigating the matter." The city attorney's office is also investigating.

The logo isn't shown in the actual ad, but is shown in the behind the scene footage.

Pepsi was attacked for their depiction of police, with people saying that it showed Kendall Jenner “curing racism” with a can of Pepsi. You can see the breakdown and video of the ad HERE.

People were also upset that Pepsi appeared to show support for an “occupying force” during a “Black Lives Matter” march, and they deemed the ad to be a “Blue Lives Matter” ad.

Pepsi eventually caved to the pressure and issued an apology to Black Lives Matter.

“Pepsi was trying to project a global message of unity, peace and understanding. Clearly we missed the mark, and we apologize. We did not intend to make light of any serious issue. We are removing the content and halting any further rollout. We also apologize for putting Kendall Jenner in this position,” Pepsi said in a statement.

Since the backlash started, SodaStream chimed in to make their stance in support of Black Lives Matter clear:

The spot launched today and is already inciting social-media outrage for making light of political protests and appearing to appropriate the Black Lives Matter movement to sell soda. In the ad, Jenner’s calm offer of a can of soda to a police officer seems to mimic a now-iconic photo of Ieshia Evans, a demonstrator who was detained by law enforcement while protesting the shooting death of Alton Sterling at the hands of police.

“Clearly the soda and bottled-water industry will stop at nothing to sell products, even making light of harsh realities, fears and prejudices that citizens face every day,” said CEO Daniel Birnbaum of SodaStream, a company that makes home water purification attachments. “Now, in addition to polluting our oceans with plastic, they’re using recent protests against police brutality to sell cans of soda? I say to Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi — you’re better than this. You know it and the world knows it.”

You can see the canceled Pepsi ad here:

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