PC Police: Seattle PD No Long Has 'Suspects' They Now Have 'Community Members'

Seattle, WA - Ultra-liberal Seattle is again, this time by altering their official forms to ensure that they are as politically correct as possible by doing away with the term "suspect."

This latest change comes after the department had previously banned the word "citizen" because the person may n

Seattle, WA - Ultra-liberal Seattle is again, this time by altering their official forms to ensure that they are as politically correct as possible by doing away with the term "suspect."

This latest change comes after the department had previously banned the word "citizen" because the person may not actually be a U.S. citizen.

Police officers are calling the latest change from "suspect" to "community member" a change which is offensive to officers who are assaulted by violent criminals.

Last month, Demarius Butts shot three Seattle PD officers after a robbery. Another suspect in that incident bashed an officer over the head with a bottle. Afterwards, officers were required to refer to the would-be cop-killers as community members, rather than suspects.

“I think this is all in an effort to make sure our report writing sounds politically correct,” Seattle Police Officers' Guild Kevin Stuckey told KIRO 7.

“I don’t think you should have a broad stroke like that and call everybody the same thing,” he said. “I don’t think there’s anything wrong with calling someone who is a victim a victim, or calling someone who’s a suspect a suspect.”

Seattle Police Chief Operating Officer Brian Maxey said that the changes are for accuracy. Labeling somebody as a suspect on a use of force form could be misleading if the person was not suspected of anything.

After wall, how else do you accurately document when police officers just start beating people who aren't suspected of doing anything wrong? It's expected that the wording will change again once they realize that people from outside of the community could be involved in crime while visiting the city.

Seattle PD isn't the only agency in Washington that's making changes to be more PC. The Washington State Department of Corrections made a change in November to replace the word "offender" with “individuals,” “student,” or “patient." They have since been working to refer to all felons by name, rather than any label.

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