Parole Board Robs Murdered Officer's Widow Of Right To Oppose Killer's Release

NYPD Cadet Francesca Mosomillo spoke about her father's murder during the Answer the Call Gala in 2018.

New York, NY – The widow of a New York police officer who was murdered in the line of duty was denied the opportunity to oppose the parole of one of her husband’s killers.

The New York State Board of Parole granted Betsy Ramos’ parole request on Oct. 29, according to a New York Police Benevolent Association (PBA) press release.

Ramos was convicted of second-degree manslaughter in the 1998 shooting death of New York Police Department (NYPD) Officer Anthony Mosomillo, and was sentenced as a persistent felony offender to 15 years to life the following year, The New York Times reported.

According to court records, Officer Mosomillo had responded to Ramos’ East Flatbush apartment to arrest her parolee boyfriend, Jose Serrano, on an outstanding drug-related warrant, The New York Times reported.

Ramos, then 33, was on federal probation for smuggling heroin from Jamaica at the time. She also had three additional prior drug-related convictions.

When Officer Mosomillo and his partner, Officer Miriam Sanchez-Torres, arrived at the home, Ramos hid Serrano beneath a trapdoor in her apartment, the PBA said.

She then “attacked” the officers when they discovered Serrano’s hiding place, according to the PBA.

During the violent struggle that ensued, Ramos helped Serrano rip Officer Sanchez-Torres’ duty weapon out of its holster, The New York Times reported.

Serrano opened fire on Officer Mosomillo, striking him four times in his neck, chest, and arms.

The veteran officer returned fire, killing his attacker.

Officer Mosomillo, a 15-year veteran-of-the-force, later succumbed to his wounds at Kings County Hospital.

He left behind his wife, Margaret, and their two young daughters, The New York Times reported.

Ramos has since spun her story into a situation of domestic abuse and victimization, and touted her supposed “extraordinary remorse and rehabilitation” during a 2018 interview with The Decarceration Collective.

“I want my words to touch you in ways you never knew existed, for one minute, to put yourself in my shoes, to see me as a human being who truly made an error in judgement, who thought with her heart instead of her head, and is now paying with her life,” Ramos said in the video clip.

“See me as the daughter who yearns to be with her mother,” the convicted killer continued. “The woman who dreams of having a child grow in her womb.”

Ramos said she doesn’t understand why she lived and Officer Mosomillo died.

“Had I had the courage to face my reality, none of this would have happened,” she said in the video. “I never imagined nor meant for anyone to get hurt on this day. There’s not one day that I don’t think about how reckless and irresponsible I was at that point in time.”

Ramos said she believes the world will be a better place with her outside of prison.

Officer Mosomillo’s widow, Margaret, said she has delivered a victim impact statement every two years since her husband’s murder in an effort to help keep Ramos behind bars.

Ramos was denied parole three times prior to January, according to The Decarceration Collective.

Margaret and other members of the Mosomillo family again delivered their statements before the parole board in January, and Ramos was denied release for a fourth time, the PBA said.

But Ramos appealed the denial, and was later granted a new hearing.

Margaret said she was never notified.

“Every two years, I have been forced to relive the pain of losing Anthony in order to deliver my victim impact statement — and always during the holidays, when I feel his loss the most,” Officer Mosomillo’s widow said in the PBA press release.

“This time, I didn’t even get that opportunity. Just a cold letter saying ‘your husband’s killer is being released,’” Margaret said. “That letter is what every family of a murdered police officer dreads, but the Parole Board could not care less. They have trampled my rights and hidden behind bureaucracy. Their sickening disregard for our family should serve as a warning to every crime victim in New York State. If they can do this to me, they can and will do it to you.”

Ramos will be released from prison on Dec. 10.

The PBA said that the move was a “new low” for the parole board.

“The con game that the Parole Board just ran on the Mosomillo family is an utter disgrace.” PBA President Patrick Lynch said in the release. “Over the past year, we have seen multiple instances in which the Parole Board staff lied to or misled the families of fallen police officers in an apparent attempt to deprive them of their legal right to oppose the release of their loved ones’ killers.”

“They should just close down the Office of Victim Assistance, because they aren’t even pretending to care about crime victims anymore,” Lynch railed. “They are rolling out the red carpet for cop-killers and other vicious criminals at every turn, while our families live in fear of being victimized a second time.”

In March, the PBA announced that the New York State Department of Corrections and the parole board had “secretly disconnected” a direct link from the PBA’s website that allowed the public to submit letters of opposition to the board.

The following month, several dozen police widows and nearly 400 NYPD officers filled 10 buses to hand-deliver 816,725 letters to the board.

The letters filled over 360 boxes, according to the PBA.

“The letters are a portion of those that the Parole Board would have received via email had they not secretly stopped accepting parole opposition letters submitted via the PBA’s website in 2014,” the PBA said.

The PBA alleged that the board is “staffed primarily by pro-criminal advocates whose main mission is to spring prisoners, regardless of the severity of their crimes, from state-funded jails.”

“Parole Commissioners have ignored the recommendations of sentencing judges, who would have handed down a no-parole sentence if the law at the time allowed them to do so,” the union said. “In other instances, Parole Commissioners have pre-judged parole requests prior to hearing the victim’s impact statements of the survivors of these cold-blooded cop killings.”

"It is no surprise to us that there is a total lack of interest by the board in the concerns and opinions of the public at large and the police officers who risk their lives in the protection of this City,” the PBA added. “We will not be silenced or ignored. The PBA will ensure that every single letter generated via our website is delivered to the board.”

Comments (67)
No. 1-14
JBoH
JBoH

"...see me as a human being who truly made an error in judgement..."

An error of judgement? You helped murder a police officer who has done more for his community than you ever did. Life in prison would have been a gift. This is a travesty.

DixieBlue
DixieBlue

"Ramos said she believes the world will be a better place with her outside of prison."

Yeah, for her. Who else benefits from her being freed?

K-9 319
K-9 319

Welcome to the new New York. Thanks to our governor this type of indignity will become the norm, and the prison reforms he signed will dump hundreds if not thousands of criminals back on our streets. He has tied our Law Enforcement Officers hands to the point that they are unable to protect our citizens. They make an arrest, and they are turned right back out on the streets with no bail, just a promise to show up for court. When are my fellow New Yorkers going to see this and vote this individual out of office.

tfort
tfort

If she has served her time and the board sees her remorse, then she deserves her parole.

RetiredCorrections
RetiredCorrections

As a persistent felon, taking the life of a police officer, she is getting out way too early, a sign of the times. Unfortunately, this seems to be the new norm, from letting people who commit felonies out without bond to giving them minimum time in prison, and those who they commit crime against have no long a voice.

Cduncanf
Cduncanf

“The woman who dreams of having a child grow in her womb.” How many little bastards do you want to pump out by how many different baby daddies so NY can support them with endless EBT cards?

1stnursemilitia
1stnursemilitia

21 years and she didn’t pull the trigger? She served more than the minimum. It’s quite obvious that the public at large has been disabused of the notion that ALL cops are heroes. Maybe when the PBA’s and the FOP‘s of the country stop aiding and abetting criminal/thug cops (which of course is support for police corruption), you’ll see a return to the days of unquestioned respect for the blue uniform. As long as the blue cancer of silence protects criminal cops from prosecution, expect more of the same. Police brutality is unpatriotic. Corrupt cop≠Hero and unfortunately the slain officer is a victim of the actions of today’s bad cop.

Stanracer
Stanracer

Every member of this parole board should be absolutely ashamed of themselves. Can a parole board be sued? This one should be.

LEO0301
LEO0301

Who knows, maybe she'll just disappear and never be seen again....

Aparent
Aparent

Anyone that kills a cop, FF or Medic should either be put to death or life in prison w/no parole

Anomie88
Anomie88

Today, I will not answer the radio call that there is an active shooter in your child’s school. Today, I will not answer the radio call that your boyfriend or husband has come home drunk and is beating you again. Today, I will not answer the radio call that your 16 year old daughter, who is very responsible, is four hours late coming home from school. Today, I will not answer the radio call that your store has been robbed or your house has been burglarized. Today, I will not stop a drunk driver from killing someone. I will not catch a rapist or a murderer or a car thief. Today, I won’t investigate the person peeping in your windows at 3 AM when you are asleep. Today, I won’t find your teenage child or college student stranded on the side of the rode without cell phone reception or injured in a crash on a secluded road. Today, I won’t perform CPR on your mother or father. Today, I will not answer the radio call that a man has a gun or tried to abduct a child or that someone has been stabbed or is trapped in a burning building and is need of rescue. Today, I will not save your child that you locked in a car or the child you were too busy to watch who went outside and fell into the swimming pool, but that I revived. No, today I will not do that. Why? Today, I was suspended from duty for doing my job, because the media, a community organizer, a lawyer who formally represented terrorists and a mayor or governor or congress person who ran on an anti-police agenda, who are afraid to tell people how it really is AND all who know nothing about policing, have vilified my profession. Or today, I was killed by a drunk driver while I was helping push a disabled car off the highway. I was shot and killed during a routine traffic stop to simply tell someone that they had a taillight out. I was killed in a traffic accident rushing to help a citizen. I was shot and killed serving a warrant on a known drug dealer. I was killed by a man when I came by to do a welfare check because his family was too busy. I was killed trying to stop a bank robbery or a grocery store robbery. I was ambushed checking a house or a business or a school. I was ambushed by people who have heeded the anti-police rhetoric and want lawlessness to succeed. I was killed doing my job. A chaplain and an officer will go to a house and tell a mom and dad or a wife or husband or a child that their son or daughter or husband or wife or father or mother won't be coming home today. The flags at many police stations were flown at half-mast today, but most people won't know why. There will be a funeral and my fellow officers will come, a twenty-one-gun salute will be given, and taps and bagpipes will be played as I am laid to rest. My name will be put on a plaque, on a wall, in a building, in a city somewhere. A folded flag will be placed on a mantel or a bookcase in a home somewhere and a family will mourn. There will be no cries for justice. There will be no riots in the streets. There will be no officers marching, screaming “no justice, no peace” because that would be “racist.” No citizens will scream that something must be done because that wouldn’t be part of the social agenda. No windows will be smashed, no cars burned, no stones thrown, no names called. Only a lonely someone crying themselves to sleep tonight will be the only sign that I was cared about and that I am missed. I was a police officer.

RetiredParoleOfficer
RetiredParoleOfficer

The respect for Law enforcement and all those behind the shield is slowly dissipating . After 27 years of being a parole officer, assisting the Parole Boards inside the jails an supervising the parolees outside the jail, one thing is clear. Politicians have lost their sense of consequences for actions of persons who wont, cant or just don't care about the law. This is just another example. The supposed "Criminal Justice Reform" Legislation ( Less is more Legislation) that is before NYS now will further devastate the NYS Parole Officer's ability to even enforce the conditions of parole of a person who was allowed out of prison BEFORE their term has expired. They think we lock up people because we somehow enjoy it. Parole Conditions were set to prevent further crimes. The crime rate has gone down. Well maybe, just Maybe its is because we were not letting out people from state prison who were committing those crimes. Maybe just maybe , we were locking up those individuals that would seriously harm, injury and even kill others. . .The crime rate is down, no thanks to policy, but to the dedicated Law enforcement Officers that uphold their swore oath to protect and defend the citizens of this great state and country. I used to be proud of the Parole Board . . . Now I bow my head in shame . . . Help is Fight the continued attack on L.E> and the Dedicated Parole Officers OPPOSE LESS IS MORE.

TexasStrong
TexasStrong

She was 33 in 1998. Which makes her 54 now. I know there are women (getting the ghetto monthly income check) who still pop out babies into their 40s but I think she's too old to fulfill her "dreams". She doesn't deserved to be a mother and she definitely didn't earn the right to be released. She participated in his murder. She should have gotten life without parole.

TeeBar
TeeBar

The same thing happened to us when we attended the parole hearing of a Pakistani drug dealer who, while drunk, killed our son in a car crash. His family were allowed to blather on about what a wonderful boy he was. We were not allowed to point out that he was a pusher nor than his "remorse" was summed up by him sneering "Shit happens." when asked about the crash. The arrogant 'Affirmative Action' mediator appointed to conduct this hearing was... get this... a Pakistani who knew the killer. Surprise... parole granted, with conditions, including NO ALCOHOL during his probationary period. He and his friends went on a celebratory pub crawl and got falling-down drunk. We reported this to the parole officer who said it was pointless to try and do anything because of the Paki clique in the court.