NYPD Threatens Legal Response If Waze App Keeps Reporting Location Of Cops

The New York Police Department told Google to remove a feature from a traffic app that tells people where police are

New York, NY – The New York Police Department (NYPD) demanded that Google remove a feature from a traffic app that tells drivers where police checkpoints and speed cameras are located.

The NYPD sent a cease-and-desist letter last weekend and said the feature on the Waze traffic app could be considered “criminal conduct,” the New York Post reported.

StreetsBlog reported that Google just added the speed camera notification recently and also has had the ability to show locations of police checkpoints.

“Individuals who post the locations of DWI checkpoints may be engaging in criminal conduct since such actions could be intentional attempts to prevent and/or impair the administration of the DWI laws and other relevant criminal and traffic laws,” said Acting Deputy Commissioner for Legal Matters Ann Prunty in the letter, according to StreetsBlog.

Prunty told Google to immediately remove “this function from the Waze application.”

The letter also stated, “The NYPD will pursue all legal remedies to prevent the continued posting of this irresponsible and dangerous information.”

The police features on the Waze app came to the attention of police in 2015. That’s when Ed Mullins, the president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association sent a letter to Google telling them to deactivate the function on the app that allows people to broadcast where police are located.

In the Feb. 10, 2015 letter, Mullins threatened to ask lawmakers to ban it if Google didn’t cooperate, according to Politico.

Mullins cited the murders of NYPD Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu of the risks that new technologies present to the police. Ismaaiyl Brinsley reportedly used the Waze app to find the police officers he shot in 2015.

Mullins wrote, “The simple convenience to WAZE users in avoiding traffic tickets pales in comparison to the risk of assassination,” according to Politico.

Comments (19)
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Judid292
Judid292

The User reports where the Police are not Waze. Just like truckers/drivers telling others across the CB, on certain FB pages, etc. I find the app very helpful for accurate accidents, slow downs, debris on roads, etc. There are other social medias that report where the police are. Why just go after one?

S.N: wish I had app downloaded when I was on 19 a few years ago.....smh $$$$, 😆

Frank R
Frank R

Aren't police themselves usually required to report the locations of DUI checkpoints?

Coldwater
Coldwater

I am a great supporter of law enforcement as a whole. Every friend I have is either LE or former military, because we understand each other. NY is probably pissing up a rope here, and I hope they fail at this. The cries of "this is going to get cops killed!" is overly dramatic. Can it happen, yes, will it happen, probably, but it's no more of a challenge to just ride around in a car till you spot a cop. Sad but true. I never believed that safety checks and DUI check points were on the up and up, and skirt being unconstitutional. The thought of any agency being able to crush free exchange of information between citizens is frightening, and leaves an open ended funnel for future infringement to liberty. This is unacceptable. We're not talking about terrorists planning an attack here, it's a road side speed trap. For decades the AAA gave out trip maps that clearly marked usual speed traps across the country. Radar detectors were once as common as cup holders, and CB radios have been used for decades for the same results. As stated many times, the ap is a great tool in warning of hazards, and it's ability to reroute traffic from bottlenecked roads is almost second to none. While I want the police to have every tool they need to safely do their jobs and come home after every shift, there is a fine line between perceived safety and the loss of rights. I never want to lose one of my friends, but I also never want to lose another right.

Burgers Allday
Burgers Allday

If they really thought it was illegal then they would have made some arrests. They are testing the waters, but I think that the popo-lawyers expect to lose this one.

charlesjandecka
charlesjandecka

I thought "visibility" was an objective of law enforcement. Plus, stupid people tend not to pay attention to warnings of danger up ahead ...