NAACP Issues Statewide Travel Advisory - Black People Not Safe With 'Racist' Missouri Police

The NAACP issued a travel advisory Aug. 2 saying that black motorists may not be safe on the highways because police in the state are racist.

In the NAACP’s statement, NAACP interim president Derrick Johnson said that the highways “may not be safe” for black individuals.

“The numerous racist incid

The NAACP issued a travel advisory Aug. 2 saying that black motorists may not be safe on the highways because police in the state are racist.

In the NAACP’s statement, NAACP interim president Derrick Johnson said that the highways “may not be safe” for black individuals.

“The numerous racist incidents, and the statistics cited by the Missouri Attorney General in the advisory, namely the fact that African Americans in Missouri are 75 percent more likely to be stopped and searched by law enforcement officers than Caucasians, are unconscionable, and are simply unacceptable in a progressive society,” Johnson said in the NAACP’s release.

The NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) is a civil rights organization which has been overshadowed in recent years by Black Lives Matter groups which falsely present themselves as civil rights organizations.

“We share the alarm and concern that black individuals enjoying the highways, roads and points of interest there may not be safe, and the national office will also be closely monitoring the progress of Governor Greitien’s review of Bill SB 43.”

Senate Bill 43 looks to change the language in a law under the Missouri Human Rights Act. Currently, the law states that is unlawful to discriminate if race is a “contributing factor” in the decision to discriminate. The proposed change would make it have to be a “motivating factor.”

The bill states: “motivating factor is defined to mean that the employee's protected classification actually played a role in the adverse action or decision and had a determinative influence on the adverse decision or action. The person must further prove that such action was the direct proximate cause of the claimed damages.”

In an article in the Kansas City Star, the president of the Missouri chapter of the NAACP, pointed the finger at police.

“How do you come to Missouri, run out of gas and find yourself dead in a jail cell when you haven’t broken any laws?” asked Rod Chapel, the president of the Missouri NAACP. “You have violations of civil rights that are happening to people. They’re being pulled over because of their skin color, they’re being beaten up or killed. We are hearing complaints at a rate we haven’t heard before.”

Chapel’s reference to the death in the jail cell apparently was to the case of Tory Sanders.

In May, Sanders was travelling in Missouri from Tennessee and asked an employee at a truck stop to call police because he had warrants out on him in Tennessee, according to the Riverfront Times.

Officers transported Sanders to the jail, and determined that his warrant wasn't serious enough to extradite him. Sanders appeared to be having mental breakdown, so a mental health professional was called to investigate him. When he was cleared by the mental health professionals, the jail tried to release him, but Sanders became agitated and barricaded himself in his jail cell.

The chief deputy allowed Sanders to borrow a cell phone to speak with his mother in hopes it would calm him down and they could get him to a hospital for treatment. The mental health professional said that due to his mental state, he should be held in protective custody for 96 hours.

After a prolonged standoff, officers went in to restrain him, and he collapsed. He was transported to the hospital where he died.

The autopsy noted no trauma on his body, and the coroner suspected an medical issue or medication. The toxicology reports have still not come back.

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