Little Rock Officer Fired For Justified Shooting

Little Rock Police Officer Charles Starks was fired by his department on May 6.

Little Rock, AR – The Little Rock police officer who opened fire on an armed suspect from the hood of the suspect’s stolen car in February has been fired by his department.

In April, Little Rock Police Officer Charles Starks was cleared of criminal wrongdoing in the fatal officer-involved shooting, KATV reported.

Little Rock Police Chief Keith Humphrey went against the recommendations of four police supervisors who reviewed the case, and fired Officer Starks on May 6.

In the letter of termination, Chief Humphrey alleged that Officer Starks violated the department’s use-of-force policy by not moving out of the path of the suspect’s vehicle as it was moving towards him.

"When confronted by an oncoming vehicle, officers will move out of its path, if possible, rather than fire at the vehicle," the policy read, according to KATV.

Little Rock Assistant Chief Hayward Finks was one of the senior officers who reviewed the incident.

"I do not believe that Officer Starks intentionally nor voluntarily stepped in front of the vehicle driven by [the suspect],” Assistant Chief Finks wrote in a letter documenting his findings.

The Little Rock Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) also expressed its strong disagreement with Officer Starks’ termination.

"Officers are required to make split second decisions and today’s decision has the potential to make officers hesitate in their actions, which could prove detrimental to the citizens of Little Rock and the officers themselves," the FOP said.

The now-former officer’s attorney, Robert Newcomb, says he plans to appeal the termination.

The fatal encounter occurred on Feb. 22, after Officer Starks spotted 30-year-old Bradley Blackshire driving a stolen vehicle in the area of Rodney Parham Road and West 12th Street, KATV reported at the time.

Blackshire backed into a parking place in a nearby lot, at which point Officer Starks drove up in his marked patrol vehicle with his lights activated, according to the Associated Press.

The officer drew his weapon, approached Blackshire’s driver’s side window, and ordered him to show his hands.

He then ordered Blackshire to get out of the vehicle multiple times, dashcam footage showed.

“What did I do?” Blackshire asked, refusing to get out of the car. “What are you going to shoot me for?”

“Get out of the car!” Officer Starks said repeatedly.

“No,” the suspect responded, just before he started driving the stolen vehicle towards the officer.

Officer Starks moved backwards and continued to issue commands, but Blackshire proceeded to drive into him.

The officer fired several rounds, at which point the car continued to move forwards, knocking Officer Starks onto the hood.

The officer fired multiple rounds at the driver through the windshield as the car carried him across the parking lot.

A second patrol car then pulled up, and collided with the passenger side of the stolen vehicle.

Officer Starks tumbled from the hood, and both officers converged on the driver.

“Put your f--king hands up!” the second officer ordered repeatedly.

But Blackshire accelerated again, sending the vehicle into a grassy area at the far end of the lot, where it crashed into something off-camera and came to rest near a tree.

“Hey, can I jump out?” a female passenger in the suspect vehicle asked the officers.

The woman climbed out of the passenger side window, then said something to one of the officers.

“She said he’s got a gun!” Officer Starks yelled out.

The officers repeatedly ordered Blackshire to show his hands and radioed for an ambulance.

Blackshire died at the scene, Little Rock Interim Police Chief Wayne Bewley said, according to the Associated Press.

Officer Starks suffered an injury to his right leg, and the female passenger in the stolen car was uninjured.

Omavi Shakur, an attorney for Blackshire’s family, has denounced Officer Starks’ account of what occurred, and said that there was no evidence that Blackshire was aware he was driving a stolen car, KATV reported.

Shakur praised Chief Humphrey’ decision to fire Officer Starks, and said he now hopes the city will “take further steps towards making amends for this avoidable, devastating tragedy,” according to KATV.

Comments
No. 1-25
IseeWhereThisIsGoing
IseeWhereThisIsGoing

Sounds like they need a new police chief instead....

Dutchuncle
Dutchuncle

Wonder if the PERSON that made this "Decision" would like it if an Officer let a Rapist, Murderer or Thief go that committed said offense on HIM or HIS Family because he WOULDN'T shoot, thereby allowing the criminal to escape??

Mig Alley
Mig Alley

Following verbal commands is very hard. Should not be a requirement if you are a 13%er. /s

LEO0301
LEO0301

I often wonder why police chiefs will ask opinions from their command staff only to ignore their recommendations when they don't hear the answer they were looking for. I also wonder if those chiefs ever worked the streets long enough to formulate intelligent decisions. Those type most often were great test takers but crappy police officers.

Copsdaughter1995
Copsdaughter1995

This is total crap!!!