Judge Rules Nunchuck Ban Violates 2nd Amendment

James Maloney initially brought suit after he had been charged with having nunchucks inside his New York home.

New York, NY – A federal judge struck down a long-standing New York state ban on nunchucks that was created by lawmakers who were afraid the rising popularity of Kung Fu movies in 1974.

Judge Pamela K. Chen, of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York, ruled last Friday in Brooklyn on a case that was first filed in 2003.

Chen determined that the New York law banning the weapon was unconstitutional and said that nunchucks were protected under the Second Amendment, The New York Times reported.

James Maloney brought the issue to court in 2003 after he had graduated from law school and formulated his argument against the state ban, but he was first arrested using the weapon in 1981 after giving a public demonstration in New York City.

Then in 2000, Maloney was charged with possession of nunchucks in his home, the Associated Press reported.

Maloney filed his lawsuit in 2003 and appealed all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court remanded Maloney’s case back down to be reconsidered in light of another decision the U.S. Supreme Court had made involving the Second Amendment, according to the Associated Press.

Maloney then filed an amended complaint in 2010.

Chen ruled that the 44-year-old laws that made having "chuka sticks" a crime were "an unconstitutional restriction on the right to bear arms under the Second Amendment and are, therefore, void," according to NBC.

Maloney, a professor at State University of New York's Maritime College, said he got more relief from the court than he had asked.

He had only been suing for the right to have nunchucks in his home but Chen struck down the anti-nunchuck laws altogether.

“How could a state simply ban any and all possession of a weapon that had a long and proud history as a martial-arts weapon, with recreational, therapeutic and self-defense utility?” Maloney asked.

Evidence presented during the trial demonstrated there were at least 64,890 wood or metal nunchucks sold in the United States in the last 23 years, according to the Associated Press.

Comments (9)
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THEDUKE
THEDUKE

"Nunchucks" was one of several nicknames given in the 60's and 70's ....Technicaly its "Nunchaku" , a martial arts device which originated in Okinawa, Japan although made more famous when used by Bruce Lee , a Kung Fu and Jeet Kune Do master (and film star) before his untimely death in 1973. The Nunchaku is a traditional Okinawan martial arts weapon consisting of two sticks connected at one end by a short chain or rope. The two sections of the weapon are commonly made out of wood, while the link is a cord or a metal chain. The Nunchaku is most widely used in martial arts such as Okinawan kobudō and karate, and is used as a training weapon, since it allows the development of quicker hand movements and improves posture. Modern-day nunchaku can be made from metal, wood, plastic or fiberglass. I was trained to use these when younger (and with other associated weapons - Sai, Bokken, Tonfa, Bo, Katana, and Shuriken) as I trained in Shotokan; an Okinawan style of Japanese martial arts.

K9ndn
K9ndn

Typical New York yankee liberal.

Skidoo
Skidoo

Compared to every other weapon known to man nunchucks are pretty useless in the hands of an average person. Yet New York politicians banned them anyway. Stupid liberals ban anything they don't understand.

tfort
tfort

A law based on Kung Fu movies? You can’t make this stuff up.

Moktor
Moktor

So... does this not apply to firearms as well, then?