Filmmaker Ezra Edelman Uses Oscar Win As Platform To Attack Police

Hollywood, CA - After winning an Oscar, filmmaker Ezra Edelman made sure to use the win as a platform to attack police.

Edelman produced a movie covering the 1994 murders of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown called O.J.: Made In America. The film was released on May 20, 2016 as part of ESPN's 30 for 3

Hollywood, CA - After winning an Oscar, filmmaker Ezra Edelman made sure to use the win as a platform to attack police.

Edelman produced a movie covering the 1994 murders of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown called O.J.: Made In America. The film was released on May 20, 2016 as part of ESPN's 30 for 30 series. The 8-hour long documentary is geared toward showing racial bias in the arrest and prosecution of O.J. Simpson for the murders of his late wife and her friend Ron Goldman.

During an interview with The Guardian, Edelman expressed how the issues of racial injustice are nothing new. “This should always be timely as an issue. This has been happening consistently since OJ’s time, for the last 20 years, and for 30 years before that, and before that.”

“It’s not a newsflash that we live in a country where there is profound misunderstanding on matters of race,” Edelman said. “So it wasn’t about African Americans rooting for OJ to be innocent – it was more that they understood that the police are very capable of framing somebody, that the justice system is very capable of not doing its job when it comes to an African American defendant, and that’s something white Americans have not experienced in the same way.”

O.J. Simpson was acquitted of the double murder after a lengthy trial but later found civilly responsible for their deaths. He later released a book "If I Did It," which was purportedly a book about how he carried out the murders. Simpson is currently in prison for armed robbery.

Ezra Edelman won the Best Documentary Feature Award at the Oscars, which he dedicated Nicole Brown, Ron Goldman and the "victims of police violence."

"First of all, this is incredible...I want to thank the Academy for acknowledging this un-traditional film," Ezra Edelman said. "But I want to acknowledge that I wouldn't be standing here tonight if not for two people who aren't here with us. Ron Goldman, Nicole Brown, this is for them and their families. It is also for others. The victims of police violence, police brutality, racially motivated violence and criminal injustice. This is their story as well as Ron and Nicole's. I'm honored to accept this award on all of their behalves."

With the Oscars so politicized, do you think that anybody really cares any more who wins? We'd like to hear what you think. Please let us know in the poll below or on our Facebook page.

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