Cops Invited To School Find Hall Lined With Police Brutality Posters

Detective Christopher Weber argued that Elisabeth Ann Johnson High School's project was misguided.

Mt. Morris, MI – Law enforcement officers conducting a “drug sweep” at the request of a Michigan high school were surprised to find handmade “police brutality” posters plastered to the wall outside a social studies classroom.

Detective Christopher Weber posted photos of the posters on social media on Tuesday night, and blasted the school district for “perpetuating the narrative, lies and victimhood” regarding supposed excessive force by law enforcement.

“The school administration there requested several K9 teams to do a drug sweep, which is common practice for many schools in Genesee County,” Det. Weber told Blue Lives Matter on Friday. “I learned from some of the K9 teams about the posters… and [I] asked to post their pictures in the interest of sharing what, in my opinion, is subject matter inappropriate for a high school.”

The posters were the product of an Elisabeth Ann Johnson High School project regarding the Fourth and Fifth Amendments, Mt. Morris Consolidated Schools Superintendent Renae Galsterer told WNEM.

Galsterer explained that students created the posters as their final assignment for the class.

While some students chose to focus on “police brutality,” others featured topics including “Terry Frisk, compare and contrast of Miranda rights, [and] specific court cases related to the amendments,” she said.

Galsterer noted that the posters were never intended to offend anyone, then blamed the officers for “not having investigated further before posting to social media,” Det. Weber, a nine-year department veteran, told Blue Lives Matter.

“The officer that took this photo didn't speak to any school employee about it prior to posting it to social media and commenting on it,” Galsterer told WNEM. “Had we known that an officer [or officers] were offended and upset we would have taken it as a learning opportunity--both for our adults involved and students.”

She then boasted of her “positive and open professional relationship” with local law enforcement.

“I would always ask that we be given the opportunity to have a conversation, prior to a social media post, if and when we have hurt and offended,” the superintendent said, adding that the posters have been taken down.

“Certainly there was no ill intent or disrespect meant by these posters. I sincerely apologize for any message of disrespect or misinformation that was interpreted by the photos or my students' projects,” Galsterer said. “That was never the intent, and the posters have been removed so that we can study them and create adjustments in future work.”

Det. Weber told Blue Lives Matter that, although the superintendent’s response “respectful and thoughtful,” it also “lacked empathy.”

“The superintendent, faculty and many students are effectively doubling down on the insult [by arguing] that I should have investigated further,” he said. “I accept no obligation to do that in order to feel disgusted by this.”

Det. Weber explained that he has an immense amount of respect for the “amazing” teachers in the district.

“I fully understand the plight of our teachers, who are amazing, particularly for this area,” he said. “To me, this issue is part of a broader issue of what is being ‘normalized’ for our youth—in the entire country.”

Det. Weber said he believes the curriculum should be altered to reflect that instances of police brutality are a rarity, and that extensive discussion of the issue has skewed the public’s perception and caused many to believe that excessive force is a regularly-occurring problem.

“It simply isn’t a large enough societal problem to merit much discussion,” he explained. “Many students obviously have an opinion that diverges from that reality, so cancel the glamorized, juvenile, poster-making entirely.”

“I think what’s missing from either the assignment, or the students’ comprehension, is math. Based on the content of the posters, the students aren’t being taught multi-varied studies that contradict their sensationalism,” the detective added.

In his post, Det. Weber explained that Galsterer's apology - coupled with her admonishing him for not coming to her with his concerns - ultimately proved his point about biases and misguided beliefs towards the law enforcement community.

"What is missing from the conversation is several years of Americans growing frustrated with a certain ‘brand’ of political influence and mantra that is dividing us," Det. Weber's post read. "Our youth shouldn’t have to take any of that under consideration for a school project, which is exactly why the project is misguided, no MATTER WHAT ITS INTENT."

"If you didn’t think it would be offensive for this to be on display when several officers arrived to assist you; if your first inclination is to shame another police officer for their disgust with this and in the same breath apologizing—Ms. Galsterer—you have much more progress to be made with respect to police-community relations," Det. Weber noted.

He then drew a comparison between instances of excessive force and the frequency of sexual relationships between students and teachers.

“I think that if the teacher wanted guidance on what changes to make for future assignments, he should ask himself what would be appropriate for covering teacher-student sexual misconduct,” Det. Weber told Blue Lives Matter. “I hate to use that analogy, but it might inspire these misguided educators to make lesson plans commensurate with the true scope of the problem."

Comments
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Old Fokker
Old Fokker

I think The President could assist some States, with more Beds in Psyche wards, in those blue states. I nominate Mad Max Waters, for a room with no view, until 2024. Please let it be so...Thumbs Up.

hivalb
hivalb

This seems like a missed opportunity for all involved. The police and the school should make arrangements to meet and have a discussion that includes the students. Listen to the other's side. Use this as an opportunity to learn from each other and to build trust. There is not enough trust between the police and citizens, and there is a reason for that. Blame is the easy way out because there is no accountability involved. Work on improving the relationship. This is a part of police work! Look for solutions.

COPWATCH
COPWATCH

After 28 years of personally working in law enforcement I believe all on Duty Officers should be required to where a body cam at all times when on duty and making contact with a subject... I have been waiting 14 years for Providence Police Department in Rhode Island to conduct its Internal Affairs investigation on three of their officers for filing a false police report and false arrest after a conspiracy of assault and false reports... keeping The Thin Blue Line on the straight and narrow sometimes requires more than integrity and honor to being sworn and to uphold the law not take it in to one's personal hands for some individuals that don't have honor... the truth hurts and the cancer can be remove when documentation confirms a lack of Honor...

Globalist Juice
Globalist Juice

Detective Weber . . . you are my H E R O. Never apologize, never backdown or cower to leftist lunacy - once you do, they DEMAND more and more - as there is never enough to satisfy the thirst for finger-wagging, shaming, and placing guilt upon those who sit on the right side of humanity. I'm glad you stood your ground and exposed the actions of this malevolent narcissist and the school and revealed what their intentions were by those drawings from the get-go, by not buying into their destructive excuse of a "cause".

Det_John_Kimble
Det_John_Kimble

Seems like an appropriate reply to this topic...